Tag Archives: networking tips

Networking with a purpose

Networking with a purpose

Networking is all about relationships

People in transition know that 60 to 80 percent of job seekers get their next positions through networking. Consequently and whenever possible, they focus their daily activities on such networking. But despite their—sometimes admittedly awkward—efforts, nothing comes of it. The reason is that they don’t have an understanding of the actual purpose of networking and how to turn it into interviews.

The purpose of networking is to cultivate relationships for advice, information, leads, and, hopefully, referrals. While it’s important to know others for this purpose, it’s equally important that those others know you. Most people are willing to network, but they have the right to expect you to (1) focus on specific companies and (2) demonstrate to them that networking is a give-and-take transaction, whereby they, too, may get from you in turn some industry intelligence.

For those who don’t know how to go about approaching a person for the purpose of networking, here’s a simple script that can be used either over the phone or via e-mail.

My name is Jane Jones. Our mutual acquaintance Stan Smith
suggested I give you a call [or send you an e-mail] because he feels
you’re an expert in [whichever] industry. Stan suggested
you might be of assistance to me. I’m currently in between jobs and looking for a role as a [insert title/position]. I don’t expect you to know
of an opening in this area, but perhaps you can share with me
your thoughts about ways I can find out who’s hiring.

The mechanics of a networking dialogue should have the following components. An initial rapport building to establish the relationship. An agenda for the purpose—and that consider how you, too, can add value. Try finding out whom the other person knows or what good contacts the person has. Another element is likability. You must develop your relationship on trust, integrity, and show of enthusiasm, motivation, and drive. Nobody enjoys a conversation with someone who’s depressed—with the possible exception of a psychologist!   And last, get engaged in the exchange, and try to feel comfortable asking for referrals. When you get them, make sure you keep your host in the loop.

If you follow these guidelines, it’s very likely that you’ll generate more interviews. In that event, make sure you’re well prepared. You don’t want to drop the ball once you’re so close to scoring.

Networking for the Job Search

Networking for the Job Search

Networking has become more challenging and yet exponentially easier at the same time. We hear about networking all the time, but what is it and how do you do it? It is a crucial skill to master whatever profession you are in.

Networking at an early age

Networking at an early age

Often people think networking must be a quid quo pro for both parties. Great networkers recognize this isn’t the case. In this session, you will learn that people are willing to network with you once three factors have been met.

With 80% of job landings not announced in the open market, networking is essential in uncovering the hidden market.  It is a “must have” skill considering that the average person will have 8 to 12 job changes in their lifetime.

Networking extends beyond the mere exchange of business cards. Skilled networkers recognize that relationships need to be cultivated and nurtured over time. Tips will be shared on how to strengthen your network seamlessly.

If your goal is to increase your skills and reduce your anxiety about meeting other people and networking, this event is perfect for you.

During this session, you will:

  • Identify where and how to network in today’s world
  • Learn why a Level 2 LinkedIn connection is more valuable than a 1st level connection
  • Learn how to ask for a networking meeting
  • Identify the three critical factors in the networking proposition
  • Eliminate your networking jitters

 

Networking Is Art and Science Combined

Networking with family and friends

Networking has a practical purpose to prepare someone for connections when needed

Networking but why?

Networking has two purposes: (1) to get you your next job, and if that’s not right now, (2) to prepare for when you need to. Networking is the most effective way to secure a job nowadays. Gerry Crispin of CareerXroads—human resources consultant to the largest companies in America—says that if you network your way into a company to the point that someone internal there delivers your résumé to the hiring manager, that delivery increases your chances 10-fold. And that means a thousand percent!

Networking is an art because it requires imagination. At the same time, it’s a science because it requires practical and systematic activity and good administrative and follow-up skills. In this article, networking refers to in-person interaction—not social networking, which is a chapter by itself and complementary to in-person networking.

Networking for job hunting

Networking is an indisputably critical part in the job hunt, and it’s easy to make mistakes. As we all know, the first impression is a lasting impression. When meeting a person for the first time, introduce yourself by name, shake hands, and be looking into the other person’s eyes. Your elevator pitch is critical too: make it short, memorable, and intriguing. Let the other person ask follow-up questions—to a level of interest. Most people deliver a too-lengthy and way-too-detailed soliloquy about their professional past. How much appetite do you think the other person has for that? It’s better to talk about your future destination and not where you’ve been in the past. The listener may be inclined to help you but can’t do much about your past.

Networking is clearly about developing a professional relationship. The other person, too, knows one hand washes the other, so if he provides you with introductions and leads today, you could be doing the same for him in the future. Make sure, though, that during the dialogue you don’t make the other person uncomfortable. Never put the other person in an awkward situation by complaining or creating a situation in which you’re seeking pity. Be positive, show energy, and, mostly, have a smile on your face. A smile means the same thing universally: it says without words that you enjoy the other person’s company, and it’s very inviting.

How to communicate while networking

It’s a best practice to listen more than to talk. Once you feel the relationship seems positive, ask for the person’s business card. It’s likely that the person will ask for yours in turn. Once you have the person’s contact information, follow up later that day or the next with a short e-mail. If both of you feel mutually beneficial, this paves the way for further communication and mutual assistance. It would be a mistake to think the other person could offer what you’re looking for—namely, a job. But you never know whom that person knows or what leads and possible referrals you could get, and that’s ultimately what you’re after, of course.

Practice networking. It may not feel natural initially, but like other skills, the more you do it, the better you get at it. In fact, after a while, you may even actually enjoy simply getting to know new people.