Tag Archives: Job advice

How to Change a Career Not a Job

How to Change a Career Not a Job

Career change is possible if you know how

No surprise that in this economy more and more people are toying around with the idea of changing careers. For some, such a change represents an opportunity; for others, it may be a necessity because their industries are shifting, shrinking, or becoming extinct. The question my clients ask with more and more frequency is how to go about it. Regrettably, though, there’s no simple or one-size-fits-all answer, because each situation is unique. In other words, no two people’s circumstances are the same. A career coach cannot make such a decision for a client; the answer has to come from the individual. A career coach can of course counsel, guide, and support the process.

Let’s make sure we understand that I’m not referring to a job change. A career change is a radical change–for example, an executive with a finance background who buys a restaurant, or a manager at AT&T, a very well-known communications company, who shifts into managing an adult community or a nursing home. Those are real-life examples of people who were successful at making those changes; I know them personally. So, the questions are, What drives the process? and What does it take to come out as a winner?

Now let’s agree from the beginning that a career change involves significant risk. Not all career changes work out well. Decisions of this nature have at least two major components: the intellectual and the emotional. The emotional part involves the pain that a person endures and that strongly motivates and impels the person toward willingness to take a risk. The other component is the intellectual part, which involves, say, the person’s need–or desire–to make more money or the person’s disappointment with the industry, or with the nature of the current job, or with an intolerable boss who is apparently not leaving soon.

At the core of the job-changing decision-making process are three questions that require concrete answers:

  • What are the job-changing individual’s values?
  • What does the job-changing individual have to offer a potential employer?
  • What does the job-changing individual expect in return?

Values have to do with one’s feelings about family, recognition, monetary rewards, security, promotions, belonging, commitment, loyalty, and so forth. The answer to the question regarding what one has to offer will be an analysis of skills–such as marketing, presentation, sales, research, and data analysis–and then identification of whether one has the traits that support those skills: is the person aggressive, independent, articulate, persuasive, logical, visionary?

The remaining issue deals with what the person wants in return. This touches on environmental and cultural factors. For example, does the person like to work in small organizations or big ones? How does the person feel about leadership styles, corporate politics, company reputation, work/life balance, and flextime for new parents, for example? And how about critical matters like salary, health coverage, and investment programs versus the minimum levels of compensation and benefits needed?

As you can see, a career change is loaded with complexities. My advice is to consult someone who is equipped to guide you as you navigate this maze. And a challenging maze it is indeed.

The Value Proposition — Why Do People Say “YES?”

Why Do People Say "YES?"

Why Do People Say “YES?”

The value proposition is all about why do people say “yes”.  In a job search, like it or not, one of the biggest challenges marketing yourself effectively to a future employer. The essence of marketing is the message, and the essence of the message is the value proposition! If you develop a strong value proposition, you will help your future employer say “yes” to hire you, to buy what you are selling. In this presentation, you’ll learn how to write a clear value proposition that provides your unique core message and offers your “customer” a bulletproof rationale to choose YOU over your competitors.

In this presentation, you will learn to develop a value proposition that answers four questions:

  1. What is it that you do?
  2. For whom do you do it?
  3. What benefits do you provide?
  4. What makes you distinctive in the marketplace?

 

Social Media Tools for People in Transition

Social media

Social media makes the world go around

Social media has arrived and has quickly emerged as a fruitful tactic. It continues to gain traction as mobile technology expands and turns recruiting into a 24/7 practice.

Are you using old school methods?

Struggling to be noticed?

Want to learn how social media can land you the job?

Despite being one of the least effective ways to land a position, most people continue to spend the hours submitting their resumes to job boards – which also happens to be one of the least effective methods of getting a job.

 Companies, recruiters, hiring managers, human resource officials are part of a powerful community who are using social media because it works.

You may find yourself avoiding social media for any number of reasons, some justifiable. However, the positives and opportunities outweigh your reluctance to jump on board. In this session, you will discover why social media needs to be part of your job search strategy and what steps you can employ to propel you ahead of the competition.

Social media not only helps you to uncover job leads and build your professional brand, it can accelerate your job search and have you enjoying that new paycheck sooner than you expected.

During this session, you will:

  • Get an inside look at how social media can work for you
  • Find that social media can share what’s not on your resume
  • Identify tools to help you manage your search
  • Understand the “must have’s” in your social media plan
  • Develop a social media game plan that’s right for you