Tag Archives: Job search

The Value Proposition — Why Do People Say “YES?”

Why Do People Say "YES?"

Why Do People Say “YES?”

The value proposition is all about why do people say “yes”.  In a job search, like it or not, one of the biggest challenges marketing yourself effectively to a future employer. The essence of marketing is the message, and the essence of the message is the value proposition! If you develop a strong value proposition, you will help your future employer say “yes” to hire you, to buy what you are selling. In this presentation, you’ll learn how to write a clear value proposition that provides your unique core message and offers your “customer” a bulletproof rationale to choose YOU over your competitors.

In this presentation, you will learn to develop a value proposition that answers four questions:

  1. What is it that you do?
  2. For whom do you do it?
  3. What benefits do you provide?
  4. What makes you distinctive in the marketplace?

 

Social Media Tools for People in Transition

Social media

Social media makes the world go around

Social media has arrived and has quickly emerged as a fruitful tactic. It continues to gain traction as mobile technology expands and turns recruiting into a 24/7 practice.

Are you using old school methods?

Struggling to be noticed?

Want to learn how social media can land you the job?

Despite being one of the least effective ways to land a position, most people continue to spend the hours submitting their resumes to job boards – which also happens to be one of the least effective methods of getting a job.

 Companies, recruiters, hiring managers, human resource officials are part of a powerful community who are using social media because it works.

You may find yourself avoiding social media for any number of reasons, some justifiable. However, the positives and opportunities outweigh your reluctance to jump on board. In this session, you will discover why social media needs to be part of your job search strategy and what steps you can employ to propel you ahead of the competition.

Social media not only helps you to uncover job leads and build your professional brand, it can accelerate your job search and have you enjoying that new paycheck sooner than you expected.

During this session, you will:

  • Get an inside look at how social media can work for you
  • Find that social media can share what’s not on your resume
  • Identify tools to help you manage your search
  • Understand the “must have’s” in your social media plan
  • Develop a social media game plan that’s right for you

 

 

 

Can You Describe Your Supervisor’s Personality?

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

I know from personal experience that when I reported to a boss I was aligned with ideologically and who trusted me, I performed very well and kept getting promoted and promoted. But there were other bosses with whom those alignments just were not there, and after a while we separated—at times voluntarily and at other times involuntarily. I’m certain my situation was not unique and that many readers have had similar situations. Why is that? Why is it possible that the same person can be considered a superstar by one supervisor and incompetent by another? After all, people don’t typically change so drastically overnight.

Are personal biases a part of work relationships?

It is known that hiring managers hire people like themselves. Logically, it’s easy to explain. In marriages, they say opposites attract; but that’s not so in work relationships and it would probably take a psychologist to explain the phenomenon. I know that managers each have an agenda. In fact, they have two. One is the business agenda, which good managers share freely within the department and perhaps outside that manager’s area of responsibility; but then, the manager also has a personal agenda. That one is kept secret because it includes personal biases and prejudices and subjects governed by law. Such a secret agenda is taboo and kept deep inside managers’ minds. If revealed, it could cost them their jobs, and managers know it. But at times, evidence of those biases and prejudices surfaces, often bringing along victims.

Job candidates should try finding out during the interview what the future boss is really like.

Many people go to the interview with a mind-set similar to that of a victim taken in for interrogation. The outcome of the interview is very important to the candidate—to the point that he behaves submissively and meekly. But this should not be. If hired and the relationship with the boss turns out not to be conducive to a good future work relationship, the outcome will be separation. In such a case, the boss is typically the one who stays on. Therefore, the best move the candidate can make during the interview is to try to uncover the interviewer’s personality. That’s not an easy task, because the hiring manager is in control. But with a few probing questions, perhaps at least a few hints could be revealed. Here are some example questions:

  • Can you tell me about your management style and philosophy?
  • How long have you been in this position?
  • What did you do before that?
  • Have the members of your staff been in their present positions for a long time?
  • What is your communication style?
  • How often do you hold staff meetings?

Perhaps during the interview the hiring manager will reveal even more about his style. Many hiring managers are good actors, and what one sees in the interview may be the opposite of what happens in reality once the candidate is actually on the job (have you heard of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde?), but my point here is that the more the candidate can find out during the interview, the better able that candidate will be to make final decisions about accepting the job if offered. My own experience has been mixed. How about yours?